Changes on the Horizon for PNWU

Thanks to the valuable feedback we’ve been able to collect from the Graduation Exit Surveys we’ve conducted over the past few years, we’d like to share some recommended changes that will go into effect here at PNWU.

 

Changes on the Horizon for PNWU

Thanks to the valuable feedback we’ve been able to collect from the Graduation Exit Surveys we’ve conducted over the past few years, we’d like to share some recommended changes that will go into effect here at PNWU.  

In reading through your comments and suggestions, one of the most common pieces of feedback was: “We need more help with residency planning!” 

In an effort to further educate our students on the match process — and to do so earlier — PNWU has added information about applying to residencies, and being competitive, to our curriculum in years one and two. Capitalizing on those efforts, first- and second-year students are also encouraged to attend “Brown Bag Lunch Sessions” throughout the year, which offer further opportunity to discuss planning for the match. 

Additionally, our staff now benefits from the use of compiled data on the average senior board scores to match in a variety of specialties. Today, we’re working hard to ensure that this information is available and easily accessible in order to further assist our students in planning what specialties they will be most competitive at. Regional Assistant Deans are charged with counseling students during their bi-annual reviews regarding the type of residencies they will be competitive in with information based primarily on how the students are doing on the various core and elective rotations.

We've also received a lot of feedback on improving our academic advising. A variety of changes have been made in this area over the past four years, and many of those changes are scheduled to go into practice this upcoming year.

Thanks to your feedback, students are now assigned to the same advisor for their first two years rather than having to switch between years one and two. This improves continuity across the pre-clinical years. Requests for changes in advisors are handled efficiently through Student Affairs and the Assessment Department to be sure faculty have access to the appropriate Progress IQ profiles.

Our faculty has helped to provide a basic advising guidebook, which will be updated this year, and Student Affairs, along with Dr. Amity and current OMS IVs, are pursuing the possibility of instituting an advisory house program. At other medical schools, similar programs have been shown to improve satisfaction with advising.